Monthly Archives: April 2014

The Advice of Shaikh Saleh al Fowzan to the Sinful Caller

Question: If I have fallen into a sin and then I sought forgiveness from Allah, should this sin prevent me from calling to Allah, or should I seek His forgiveness and continue to call to Allah?

Answer: If the only person who called to Allah were a person free from all sins, no one would be qualified to call to Allah! There is no one who is free from sins, but if the Muslim commits a sin, he should seek forgiveness, and the sin should not prevent him from calling to Allah and enjoining the good and forbidding evil. The caller should not say: I have sins and incorrect deeds, I am not fit (for calling to Allah), rather, he should leave off and avoid the sins. No one has forced him to commit them. He should abandon sinning and repent to Allah, (and at the same time) he should not abandon performing righteous deeds, calling to Allah, enjoining the good and forbidding the evil.

Source: Q & A session at the end of Igathatul Lahfaan lesson 28/4/1434h. corresponding to March 19, 2013

Link: http://alfawzan.af.org.sa/node/14407

What is the ruling on wiping the face and body with the hands after making du’aa’, and kissing the eyes?

Praise be to Allaah.

It is not prescribed to wipe the face after making du’aa’. There are many ahaadeeth which describe how the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) called upon his Lord in du’aa’, and there is no proven report that he used to wipe his face after making du’aa’. 

Those who say that the face should be wiped quoted some ahaadeeth as evidence, but upon further examination they are not saheeh, and do not support one another. 

As for the views of the scholars who say that it is not allowed to wipe the face, they include the following: 

1 – Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal said: It is not known that anyone used to wipe his face after making du’aa’ except al-Hasan. 

Al-‘Ilal al-Mutanaahiyah, 2/840, 841 

2 – Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah said: With regard to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) raising his hands when saying du’aa’, there are many saheeh ahaadeeth concerning this, but as for his wiping his face with his hands, there are only one or two hadeeths concerning that, and they cannot be taken as evidence. 

Majmoo’ al-Fataawa, 22/519 

3 – al-‘Izz ibn ‘Abd al-Salaam said: No one wipes his face with his hands after saying du’aa’ except one who is ignorant. 

Fataawa al-‘Izz ibn ‘Abd al-Salaam, p. 47 

If it is not permitted to wipe the face after making du’aa’, it is more likely that the person who says du’aa’ should not be allowed to wipe his body either, or to kiss his eyes. 

Rather the scholars stated that kissing the thumbs and placing them on the eyes is a bid’ah that was introduced by some of the Sufi tareeqahs, and there is a hadeeth concerning that which is falsely attributed to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). 

Shaykh Muhammad ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked about the ruling on wiping the face with the hands after making du’aa’. He replied: 

Wiping the face with the hands after making du’aa’ is more likely to be not prescribed in Islam, because the ahaadeeth that have been narrated concerning that are da’eef (weak). Shaykh al-Islam (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: They cannot be used as evidence. If we are not certain or we think it most likely that this is not prescribed, then it is better not to do it, because Islamic rulings cannot be proven on the basis of mere conjecture, unless we believe it to be mostly likely to be the case. 

What I think about wiping the face with the hands after du’aa’ is that it is not Sunnah. As is well known, the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) prayed for rain during his Friday khutbah and raised his hands, but it is not narrated that he wiped his face with them. Similarly in a number of ahaadeeth it says that the Prophet raised his hands, but there is no proof that he wiped his face. End quote. 

Majmoo’ Fataawa Ibn ‘Uthaymeen, 14/question no. 781 

And Allaah knows best.

Is salaat al-raghaa’ib Sunnah and is it mustahabb to offer this prayer?.

Praise be to Allaah.

Salaat al-raghaa’ib is one of the innovations (bid’ahs) that have been introduced in the month of Rajab. It is done on the night of the first Friday in Rajab, between Maghrib and ‘Isha’, and is preceded by fasting on the first Thursday of Rajab. 

Salaat al-raghaa’ib was first introduced in Bayt al-Maqdis (Jerusalem) in 480 AH. There is no report that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did it, or any of his companions, or any of the best generations or imams. This alone is sufficient to prove that it is a reprehensible innovation, and it is not a praiseworthy Sunnah. 

The scholars have warned against it and pointed out that it is innovation and misguidance. 

Al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in al-Majmoo’ (3/548) 

The prayer which is known as salaat al-raghaa’ib, which is twelve rak’ahs that are offered between Maghrib and ‘Isha’ on the night of the first Friday in Rajab, and praying one hundred rak’ahs on the night of Nusf Sha’baan (halfway through Sha’baan) are both reprehensible innovations. No one should be deceived by the fact that they are mentioned in Qoot al-Quloob and Ihya’ ‘Uloom al-Deen, or by the hadeeth which is quoted in these two books, because all of that is false. No one should be deceived by some of those imams who were confused about the ruling on these prayers and wrote essays stating that they are mustahabb, for they are mistaken in that. Imam Abu Muhammad ‘Abd al-Rahmaan ibn Isma’eel al-Maqdisi wrote a valuable book showing that they are false, and he did well in that, may Allaah have mercy on him. End quote. 

Al-Nawawi also said in Sharh Muslim: 

May Allaah curse the one who fabricated and introduced that, for it is a reprehensible innovation, one of the innovations which constitute misguidance and ignorance, and it involves obvious evils. A number of imams have written valuable works explaining that those who offer this prayer and the one who invented it are misguided, and they quoted a great deal of evidence to show that it is wrong and false, and that those who do it are misguided. End quote. 

Ibn ‘Aabideen said in his Haashiyah (2/26): 

It says in al-Bahr: Hence we know that it is makrooh to gather for salaat al-raghaa’ib, which is done on the first Friday of Rajab, and that it is an innovation. 

The scholar Noor al-Deen al-Maqdisi wrote a good essay on this topic which he called Rad’ al-Raaghib ‘an Salaat al-Raghaa’ib, in which he covered most of the comments of earlier and later scholars among the four madhhabs. End quote. 

Ibn Hajr al-Haytami (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked: Is it permissible to offer salaat al-raghaa’ib in congregation or not? 

He replied: 

Salaat al-raghaa’ib is like the prayer that is known as laylat al-nusf min Sha’baan (half way through Sha’baan). These are two reprehensible innovations and the hadeeth which speaks of them is mawdoo’ (fabricated). It is forbidden to offer these prayers either individually or in congregation.” End quote. 

Al-Fataawa al-Fiqhiyyah al-Kubra, 1/216 

Ibn al-Haaj al-Maaliki said in al-Madkhal (1/294): 

Among the innovations that have been introduced in this noble month (i.e., Rajab) is that on the night of the first Friday thereof, they pray salaat al-raghaa’ib in the mosques, and they gather in some mosques and do this innovation openly in the mosques with an imam and congregation, as if it is a prescribed prayer… the view of Imam Maalik (may Allaah have mercy on him) is that it is makrooh to do this prayer, because it was not done by those who came before, and all goodness is to be found in following them (may Allaah be pleased with them). End quote. 

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: 

As for innovating a prayer which is done regularly with a certain number of rak’ahs, with a certain recitation and at a certain time in congregation, like these prayers that are being asked about here – such as salaat al-raghaa’ib on the first Friday of Rajab, and halfway through Sha’baan, and the night of the twenty-seventh of Rajab, and so on – these are not prescribed in Islam, according to the consensus of the imams of Islam, as was stated by the reliable scholars. No one established such a thing but those who are ignorant and innovators. Things like this open the door to changing the laws  and rituals of Islam and becoming like those who instituted things which Allaah has not ordained. End quote. 

Al-Fataawa al-Kubra, 2/239 

Shaykh al-Islam was also asked about it and he said: 

This prayer was not offered by the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) or by any of the Sahaabah or the Taabi’een or the imams of the Muslims. The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did not enjoin it and neither did any of the salaf or imams. They did not suggest that this night has any virtue for which it should be singled out. The hadeeth which is narrated concerning that from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) is false and fabricated, according to scholarly consensus. Hence the scholars said that it is forbidden and not mustahabb. End quote. 

Al-Fataawa al-Kubra, 2/262 

It says in al-Mawsoo’ah al-Fiqhiyyah (22/262): 

The Hanafis and Shaafa’is stated that praying salaat al-raghaa’ib on the first Friday of Rajab, or on Laylat al-nusf min Sha’baan, in a specific manner or with a specific number of rak’ahs, is a reprehensible innovation. 

Abu’l-Faraj ibn al-Jawzi said: Salaat al-raghaa’ib is a fabrication that is falsely attributed to the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). They stated that these payers are a bid’ah and are forbidden for a number of reasons. There is no report from the Sahaabah, Taabi’een or imams about these two prayers. If they were prescribed in Islam then the salaf would not have been unaware of them. Rather they were introduced in the 400s (fifth century AH). End quote.

Is there any particular virtue in performing ‘Umrah in the month of Rajab?.

Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly: 

There is no report from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) – as far as we know – to suggest that there is any particular virtue in performing ‘Umrah in the month of Rajab, or that it is encouraged. Rather it is proven that there is a particular virtue in performing ‘Umrah in the month of Ramadaan, and in the months of Hajj, which are Shawwaal, Dhu’l-Qa’dah and Dhu’l-Hijjah. 

There is no report to prove that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) performed ‘Umrah in Rajab, rather that was denied by ‘Aa’ishah (may Allaah be pleased with her), who said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) never performed ‘Umrah in Rajab. Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 1776; Muslim, 1255. 

Secondly: 

Something that has been introduced into the religion is what some people do, namely singling out the month of Rajab for ‘Umrah, because no one should single out a specific time for doing an act of worship unless that has been prescribed in sharee’ah. 

Ibn al-‘Attaar, the student of al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on them both) said: 

What I have heard about the people of Makkah, may Allaah increase it in honour, is that they are accustomed to performing ‘Umrah a great deal in Rajab. This is something for which I know of no basis, rather it is proven in the hadeeth that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “ ‘Umrah in Ramadaan is equivalent to Hajj.” End quote.

Shaykh Muhammad ibn Ibraaheem (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in his Fataawa (6/131): 

With regard to singling out some days of Rajab for any kinds of ziyaarah etc, there is no basis for that. Imam Abu Shaamah stated in his book al-Bida’ wa’l-Hawaadith that performing acts of worship at specific times which were not prescribed by Islam is not right, because no time is better than any other, except times when it is prescribed to perform a certain kind of worship, or a time when all kinds of good deeds are better than at other times. Hence the scholars denounced the singling out of the month of Rajab for performing ‘Umrah a great deal. End quote. 

But if a person goes for ‘Umrah during Rajab without believing that there is any special virtue in that, but it just so happens that it is easy for him to travel at that time, there is nothing wrong with that.

Is there any special virtue in fasting during the month of Rajab?.

Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly: 

The month of Rajab is one of the sacred months of which Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Verily, the number of months with Allaah is twelve months (in a year), so was it ordained by Allaah on the Day when He created the heavens and the earth; of them four are Sacred (i.e. the 1st, the 7th, the 11th and the 12th months of the Islamic calendar). That is the right religion, so wrong not yourselves therein”

[al-Tawbah 9:36] 

The sacred months are: Rajab, Dhu’l-Qa’dah, Dhu’l-Hijjah and Muharram.  

Al-Bukhaari (4662) and Muslim (1679) narrated from Abu Bakrah (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The year is twelve months, of which four are sacred: three consecutive months, Dhu’l-Qa’dah, Dhu’l-Hijjah and Muharram, and Rajab Mudar which comes between Jumaada and Sha’baan. 

These months are called sacred for two reasons: 

1-     Because fighting therein is forbidden unless initiated by the enemy

2-     Because transgression of the sacred limits therein is worse than at other times. 

Hence Allaah has forbidden us to commit sins during these months, as He says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“wrong not yourselves therein”

[al-Tawbah 9:36]  

Although committing sins is haraam and forbidden during these months and at other times, in these months it is more forbidden. 

Al-Sa’di (may Allaah have mercy on him) said (p. 373): 

In the phrase “wrong not yourselves therein”, the pronoun may be understood as referring to twelve months. Allaah states that He has made them a measure of time for His slaves, which they may use for worshipping Him, and thank Allaah for His blessings, and they serve the interests of His slaves, so beware of wronging yourselves therein. 

The pronoun may also be understood as referring to the four sacred months, and this forbids them to wrong themselves in those months in particular, as well as it being forbidden to do wrong at all times, because it is more forbidden at this time, but it is worse at this time than at others. End quote. 

Secondly: 

With regard to fasting the month of Rajab, there is no saheeh hadeeth to indicate that there is any special virtue in fasting all or part of this month. 

What some people do, singling out some days of Rajab for fasting, believing that they are better than others, has no basis in sharee’ah. 

But there is a report from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) which indicates that it is mustahabb to fast during the sacred months (and Rajab is one of the sacred months). The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Fast some days of the sacred months and not others.” Narrated by Abu Dawood, 2428; classed as da’eef by al-Albaani in Da’eef Abi Dawood. 

Even if this hadeeth were saheeh, it indicates that it is mustahabb to fast during the sacred months. So if a person fasts during Rajab because of this, and he also fasts in the other sacred months, there is nothing wrong with that. But singling out Rajab for fasting is not right. 

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in Majmoo’ al-Fataawa (25/290): 

As for fasting in Rajab in particular, the ahaadeeth concerning that are all da’eef (weak), and in fact mawdoo’ (fabricated). The scholars do not rely on any of them. They are not among the da’eef ahaadeeth which have been narrated concerning virtues, rather most of them are fabricated and false. In al-Musnad and elsewhere there is a hadeeth which says that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) enjoined fasting the sacred months, namely Rajab, Dhu’l-Qa’dah, Dhu’l-Hijjah and Muharram, but this has to do with fasting during all of them, not just Rajab. End quote. 

Ibn al-Qayyim (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:  

Every hadeeth which mentions fasting in Rajab and praying during some of its nights is false and fabricated.” End quote from al-Manaar al-Muneef, p. 96 

Al-Haafiz ibn Hajar said in Tabyeen al-‘Ajab (p. 11) 

There is no saheeh hadeeth that would count as evidence which speaks of the virtue of the month of Rajab, or that speaks of fasting this month or part of it, or of spending any particular night of it in prayer.  

Shaykh Sayyid Saabiq (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in Fiqh al-Sunnah (1/282): 

Fasting in Rajab is no better than fasting in any other month, except that  it is one of the sacred months. There is no report in the saheeh Sunnah to suggest that there is anything special about fasting in this month. Whatever has been narrated concerning that is not fit to be quoted as evidence. End quote. 

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked about fasting on the twenty-seventh of Rajab and spending that night in prayer. He replied: 

Fasting on the twenty-seventh of Rajab and spending that night in prayer is a bid’ah (innovation), and every bid’ah is a going astray. End quote. 

Majmoo’ Fataawa Ibn ‘Uthaymeen, 20/440.
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Buying Shares in Companies which Deals with Riba (interest) – Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al-‘Uthaymeen

Buying shares in companies which deals with riba

Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al-‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked about the ruling on buying shares in companies.

He replied:

Buying shares in companies is subject to further discussion, because we have heard that they put their money in foreign banks, or quasi-foreign banks, and take interest on it, which is a kind of riba. If this is true then buying shares in them is haraam and is a major sin, because riba is one of the worst of major sins. But if it is free of this then buying shares is halaal, so long as there is nothing else involved that is haraam according to sharee’ah. End quote.

Majmoo’ Fataawa Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (18/question no. 119).

Don’t miss to read the below interesting analysis : (excerpted from the net)

Take the top 500 corporate giants of India which are basically engaged in Halal business and their end products and services too are Halal. One shall be astonished to look at the capital structure of these companies as more than half of the capital of these companies comes from debt instruments such as interest carrying debentures, secured loans and other borrowing from commercial banks and financial institutions. In fact a company is said to be based upon strong fundamentals whose debt-equity ratio is in the range of 60:40 to 70:30. And nearly all these 500 companies conform to this criterion mostly. The moot point here is can a company be bracketed under Halal business concerns just because its finished goods and services are Halal even though the majority of its capital and finance comes from debt and interest-carrying loans. Take these top 500 Halal companies again. It is a bare fact that these companies park their reserves and surplus capital in high-yield and fixed income debt instruments and government securities. And sometimes the returns from these investments far exceed the income from their declared business. Corporate giant, Tata Iron and Steel Company which is ranked second in terms of market capitalization and weightage on the Sensex of the Bombay Stock Exchange is a classic case whose main income in the early 90’s came from such investments under the sub-head “Other Income”.

Viewed from yet another angle, a good company’s capital, as stated earlier, mainly consists of nearly 40 per cent equity and 60 per cent debt. At times of boom in the economy, companies usually earn more than 100 per cent on their investments. But they pay back their debtors only the pre-determined interest of say 20 per cent and pass the benefit of the remaining 80 per cent to their equity share holders besides their own 100 per cent entitlement. Under this scenario the profit-sharing of the debtors and the equity share holders would be 20 per cent and 220 per cent respectively. Conversely, at times of economic recession, companies could hardly earn anything, and even the debt servicing has to be met with from the share of the equity share-holders such as company reserves and further borrowing. In the former case if the equity share holders get abundantly benefited from the Haram investment of the debtors, in the latter case, it is the turn of their Halal investment to get the raw deal at the hands of the Haram one. The fundamental question here is does Islam permit the intermingling of Halal and Haram investments with such dire consequences, and that too of the present magnitude? The plain and unambiguous answer is a simple “no”. How can the stock-market trading be termed Halal then?

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